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THE FLEXITARIAN DIET EXPLAINED – WHY IT’S NOT VEGETARIANISM WITH CHEATING

THE FLEXITARIAN DIET EXPLAINED – WHY IT’S NOT VEGETARIANISM WITH CHEATING

The increasing number of vegans and vegetarians is a huge worldwide change, with more consumers trending towards a flexitarian diet. For 2019, we’ve predicted the rise of flexitarians and the move from the traditional “meat and three veg” to the vegetables being the star of the show and the meat being a small side.

What is Flexitarianism?

It says it in the name – a combination of flexible and Vegetarian, the Flexitarian diet has no clear cut rules, but rather promotes a flexible way of eating where you;

  • Eat mostly protein from plants and incorporate free-range and organic meat and animal products occasionally.
  • Eat mostly fruits, vegetables, legumes and whole grains
  • Eat less processed food, sweets and sugar, and more natural form of foods.

What are the health benefits?

Reducing meat consumption can have a beneficial impact on long term health and wellbeing.  By replacing meat with alternatives in the diet, you may be increasing other beneficial foods such as fruit, vegetables, plant-based proteins and whole-grains.

The environmental impact

Along with the health benefits, experts say the flexitarian diet may help slow the rising global temperatures. Globally, meat production and consumption significantly contribute to major environmental concerns such as climate change, air quality, loss of biodiversity and water pollution.

What do flexitarians eat?

Flexitarians can eat a wide range of food but the main aim is for the majority of it to be plant-based. A common misconception is that plant-based means vegan but if opting for a flexitarian diet, plant-based simply means that the base, or foundation, of your diet is plants — vegetables, fruits, whole grains, pulses (beans and lentils), nuts and seeds.

How to get started in reducing meat consumption

Some people start by doing meat-free Monday whereas others only eat meat on the weekends. Reducing the amount of meat you have in each meal and filling the gaps with vegetables is also a good start. Think salads, stir-fries and vegetarian curries.

We have a wide array of vegetarian and plant-based recipes for you to try or pop into your closest Farro store and pick up some our plant-based meat options for meatless Monday. All of the meat sold at Farro is also free-range and organic.